Ramblings of a Writer

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28,370 notes

as-howarth asked: Hey John, what is your reaction to the news that the Riverside district has chosen to ban TFIOS from middle school libraries on the grounds that it deals with mortality and sex? I remember your reactions to similar situations concerning your books have been pretty animated and wondered what you thought?

fishingboatproceeds:

I guess I am both happy and sad.

I am happy because apparently young people in Riverside, California will never witness or experience mortality since they won’t be reading my book, which is great for them.

But I am also sad because I was really hoping I would be able to introduce the idea that human beings die to the children of Riverside, California and thereby crush their dreams of immortality.

31,421 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

Since the TFIOS movie became available On Demand and for digital download and people can now pause and zoom in and stuff, many people have asked who wrote the pages of An Imperial Affliction that appear in the movie.
I did. Executive producer Isaac Klausner asked me to write four pages (the two you see here and the final two pages of the book) for the movie edition of An Imperial Affliction, so I did. In this passage, Anna is recalling intense pain breaking through her high doses of narcotic pain medication. 
The book that Hazel reads in the movie is just the four pages I wrote printed over and over again hundreds of times. I have a copy of it in my house; it’s my only souvenir from the movie set.

I’d like a copy of AIA.

fishingboatproceeds:

Since the TFIOS movie became available On Demand and for digital download and people can now pause and zoom in and stuff, many people have asked who wrote the pages of An Imperial Affliction that appear in the movie.

I did. Executive producer Isaac Klausner asked me to write four pages (the two you see here and the final two pages of the book) for the movie edition of An Imperial Affliction, so I did. In this passage, Anna is recalling intense pain breaking through her high doses of narcotic pain medication. 

The book that Hazel reads in the movie is just the four pages I wrote printed over and over again hundreds of times. I have a copy of it in my house; it’s my only souvenir from the movie set.

I’d like a copy of AIA.

2,196 notes

Update on YouTube Sexual Abuse

regularusername0409:

In March of this year I threw a grenade into the Nerdfighter/YouTube community. As difficult as the aftermath has been, I’m proud of myself and of my friends for speaking up and I’m thankful to all of you have been standing with me and supporting me through this. I would truly be lost without…

1,158 notes

rainbowrowell:

melissaanelli:

mightymudha:

STILL MY FAVORITE LEAKY MOMENT.

freaking love our team melissaanelli squirreljournal yourcanadianoverlord leah617 onthebigadventure lizziekeiper

Thanks for filming ohblainers

This has been making us laugh since we thought it might be fun to do… until it happened. And then now. Still laughing. Travis Slavin and Maxwell Glick, you are heroes.

LEAKYCON.

REICHENBACH ESCALATOR.

1,266 notes

melissaanelli:

Platform 9 3/4. Seriously. Pinch me. Just wait until we get all the wizards here in six weeks.

466 notes

Cather + Wren = Catherine? Fangirl and the pin/pen merger

rainbowrowell:

lies:

genderific:

allthingslinguistic:

I recently read the novel Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell, which is an excellent book that has nothing to do with linguistics. Despite that, I ended up noticing something linguistically interesting about the characters’ names, specifically…

This is interesting. I pronounce the PIN and PEN vowels differently, but when I say “Catherine,” the RINE vowel goes all schwa … unless I’m really enunciating. In that case, it has a very lilted PIN sound. (Also, unless I’m enunciating, I say it in 2.5 syllables.)

When I wrote this, I imagined Cather and Wren’s mom splitting “Catherine” in two, and cheating a little to get two words that sounded like names.

I was inspired by my great-grandmother who didn’t realize she was having twins and didn’t feel like coming up with a new name. So “Josefina” became Josie and Fina.  

I almost always imagine, when I’m naming main characters, what their parents were thinking when they named them …

It’s surprised me how many Fangirl readers have never heard the name Levi. I get asked how to pronounce it a few times a week on Twitter. (Levi has the same vowel sounds as KNEE-HIGH.) (Old Testament names are very popular in Nebraska.) (Here is a really weird Levi’s commercial where you can hear it said out loud.)

It’s also surprised me that many people pronounce Eleanor — ellenER. I pronounce it ellenOR.

People sometimes ask if Park is short for Parker. Nope. Park is a common Korean family name; I imagined it was his mother’s maiden name, and that his parents gave it to him as a tie to his mom’s family.

If you’re really looking at the names in my books, you’ll see that almost all the last names refer to places in Nebraska. Douglas and Sheridan are both counties. And Cather, Piper and Avery are building names at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln …

And Lincoln, of course, is the name of the main character of my first book.

374 notes

maggie-stiefvater:


A Great Big 10 Minute Drawing Lesson
Good prepwork makes good art. Taking 20 seconds to do a value sketch before you do an actual sketch or drawing can tell you which shapes are going to be hard for you, demonstrate if there are problem areas with your reference, help you decide how to change things, and help you figure out how you’re going to place the final object on the page.

1. Break your reference image (from life or photo) into three values. Dark, midtone, light. No more! Only 3!* Squint to see them.

2. Put the darks down. Not sure if it’s dark or not? Round everything to the closest value. ONLY 3, PEOPLE.

3. Add the midtones.

4. Leave the lights (or introduce them if you’re working on colored paper).
5. Remember that your background choices shape your foreground and are as important a decision as the subject.

6. Draw what you see, not what you know is there. (i.e. artists often find noses difficult, because they draw a nose. Draw the three values, and a nose will appear)

7. Be Rembrandt.


A value study can be done with a Sharpie on a receipt or the back of your hand. 20 seconds. It’s only  your worksheet, so it doesn’t matter how ugly or wrong it is — no one’s gonna see it unless you post it on your tumblr with numbers photoshopped over it.
20 seconds. I swear I’m giving you the keys to the universe here. Don’t crash it.

20 second value study —> 30 second line study —-> 20 minute drawing****

 

* If it doesn’t make sense in three values, it’s not the greatest composition/ reference. FIND A NEW REFERENCE**
**grossly oversimplified***
***we only have 10 minutes here
****the more involved my final work is going to be, the more prep work I’m going to do. It’ll save me time in the long run and keep me from doing stupid things in the final
GO FORTH AND FILL TUMBLR WITH ART FAREWELL FAREWELL

maggie-stiefvater:

A Great Big 10 Minute Drawing Lesson

Good prepwork makes good art. Taking 20 seconds to do a value sketch before you do an actual sketch or drawing can tell you which shapes are going to be hard for you, demonstrate if there are problem areas with your reference, help you decide how to change things, and help you figure out how you’re going to place the final object on the page.

1. Break your reference image (from life or photo) into three values. Dark, midtone, light. No more! Only 3!* Squint to see them.

2. Put the darks down. Not sure if it’s dark or not? Round everything to the closest value. ONLY 3, PEOPLE.

3. Add the midtones.

4. Leave the lights (or introduce them if you’re working on colored paper).

5. Remember that your background choices shape your foreground and are as important a decision as the subject.

6. Draw what you see, not what you know is there. (i.e. artists often find noses difficult, because they draw a nose. Draw the three values, and a nose will appear)

7. Be Rembrandt.

A value study can be done with a Sharpie on a receipt or the back of your hand. 20 seconds. It’s only  your worksheet, so it doesn’t matter how ugly or wrong it is — no one’s gonna see it unless you post it on your tumblr with numbers photoshopped over it.

20 seconds. I swear I’m giving you the keys to the universe here. Don’t crash it.

20 second value study —> 30 second line study —-> 20 minute drawing****

 Gansey sketch with prep

* If it doesn’t make sense in three values, it’s not the greatest composition/ reference. FIND A NEW REFERENCE**

**grossly oversimplified***

***we only have 10 minutes here

****the more involved my final work is going to be, the more prep work I’m going to do. It’ll save me time in the long run and keep me from doing stupid things in the final

GO FORTH AND FILL TUMBLR WITH ART FAREWELL FAREWELL