Ramblings of a Writer

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Cather + Wren = Catherine? Fangirl and the pin/pen merger

rainbowrowell:

lies:

genderific:

allthingslinguistic:

I recently read the novel Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell, which is an excellent book that has nothing to do with linguistics. Despite that, I ended up noticing something linguistically interesting about the characters’ names, specifically…

This is interesting. I pronounce the PIN and PEN vowels differently, but when I say “Catherine,” the RINE vowel goes all schwa … unless I’m really enunciating. In that case, it has a very lilted PIN sound. (Also, unless I’m enunciating, I say it in 2.5 syllables.)

When I wrote this, I imagined Cather and Wren’s mom splitting “Catherine” in two, and cheating a little to get two words that sounded like names.

I was inspired by my great-grandmother who didn’t realize she was having twins and didn’t feel like coming up with a new name. So “Josefina” became Josie and Fina.  

I almost always imagine, when I’m naming main characters, what their parents were thinking when they named them …

It’s surprised me how many Fangirl readers have never heard the name Levi. I get asked how to pronounce it a few times a week on Twitter. (Levi has the same vowel sounds as KNEE-HIGH.) (Old Testament names are very popular in Nebraska.) (Here is a really weird Levi’s commercial where you can hear it said out loud.)

It’s also surprised me that many people pronounce Eleanor — ellenER. I pronounce it ellenOR.

People sometimes ask if Park is short for Parker. Nope. Park is a common Korean family name; I imagined it was his mother’s maiden name, and that his parents gave it to him as a tie to his mom’s family.

If you’re really looking at the names in my books, you’ll see that almost all the last names refer to places in Nebraska. Douglas and Sheridan are both counties. And Cather, Piper and Avery are building names at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln …

And Lincoln, of course, is the name of the main character of my first book.

352 notes

maggie-stiefvater:


A Great Big 10 Minute Drawing Lesson
Good prepwork makes good art. Taking 20 seconds to do a value sketch before you do an actual sketch or drawing can tell you which shapes are going to be hard for you, demonstrate if there are problem areas with your reference, help you decide how to change things, and help you figure out how you’re going to place the final object on the page.

1. Break your reference image (from life or photo) into three values. Dark, midtone, light. No more! Only 3!* Squint to see them.

2. Put the darks down. Not sure if it’s dark or not? Round everything to the closest value. ONLY 3, PEOPLE.

3. Add the midtones.

4. Leave the lights (or introduce them if you’re working on colored paper).
5. Remember that your background choices shape your foreground and are as important a decision as the subject.

6. Draw what you see, not what you know is there. (i.e. artists often find noses difficult, because they draw a nose. Draw the three values, and a nose will appear)

7. Be Rembrandt.


A value study can be done with a Sharpie on a receipt or the back of your hand. 20 seconds. It’s only  your worksheet, so it doesn’t matter how ugly or wrong it is — no one’s gonna see it unless you post it on your tumblr with numbers photoshopped over it.
20 seconds. I swear I’m giving you the keys to the universe here. Don’t crash it.

20 second value study —> 30 second line study —-> 20 minute drawing****

 

* If it doesn’t make sense in three values, it’s not the greatest composition/ reference. FIND A NEW REFERENCE**
**grossly oversimplified***
***we only have 10 minutes here
****the more involved my final work is going to be, the more prep work I’m going to do. It’ll save me time in the long run and keep me from doing stupid things in the final
GO FORTH AND FILL TUMBLR WITH ART FAREWELL FAREWELL

maggie-stiefvater:

A Great Big 10 Minute Drawing Lesson

Good prepwork makes good art. Taking 20 seconds to do a value sketch before you do an actual sketch or drawing can tell you which shapes are going to be hard for you, demonstrate if there are problem areas with your reference, help you decide how to change things, and help you figure out how you’re going to place the final object on the page.

1. Break your reference image (from life or photo) into three values. Dark, midtone, light. No more! Only 3!* Squint to see them.

2. Put the darks down. Not sure if it’s dark or not? Round everything to the closest value. ONLY 3, PEOPLE.

3. Add the midtones.

4. Leave the lights (or introduce them if you’re working on colored paper).

5. Remember that your background choices shape your foreground and are as important a decision as the subject.

6. Draw what you see, not what you know is there. (i.e. artists often find noses difficult, because they draw a nose. Draw the three values, and a nose will appear)

7. Be Rembrandt.

A value study can be done with a Sharpie on a receipt or the back of your hand. 20 seconds. It’s only  your worksheet, so it doesn’t matter how ugly or wrong it is — no one’s gonna see it unless you post it on your tumblr with numbers photoshopped over it.

20 seconds. I swear I’m giving you the keys to the universe here. Don’t crash it.

20 second value study —> 30 second line study —-> 20 minute drawing****

 Gansey sketch with prep

* If it doesn’t make sense in three values, it’s not the greatest composition/ reference. FIND A NEW REFERENCE**

**grossly oversimplified***

***we only have 10 minutes here

****the more involved my final work is going to be, the more prep work I’m going to do. It’ll save me time in the long run and keep me from doing stupid things in the final

GO FORTH AND FILL TUMBLR WITH ART FAREWELL FAREWELL

341 notes

maggie-stiefvater:

I want you to know that I’m posting tonight’s unfinished sketch fragment only so you know that sometimes, when you’re partway through sketching the raven, you’re going to look down and realize that it looks a lot like your character is holding a part of his own anatomy and that there’s just no fixing that.

maggie-stiefvater:

I want you to know that I’m posting tonight’s unfinished sketch fragment only so you know that sometimes, when you’re partway through sketching the raven, you’re going to look down and realize that it looks a lot like your character is holding a part of his own anatomy and that there’s just no fixing that.